5 Reasons to Put Your Kids in Light-Reactive Lenses

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If you don’t work in the eye care industry, you may be asking yourself, “What in the world is a light-reactive lens?”

As the name implies, a light-reactive lens reacts to light – ultraviolet light (UV) specifically. These lenses conveniently pack two different looks into one pair of frames. Indoors, they’re clear like standard prescriptions lenses. And when you step outside, they darken in response to UV light (the sun) and act like sunglasses. Come back inside again, and they quickly shift back to clear. Pretty cool, huh?

Light-reactive lenses are a great option for anyone, but here are five reasons why they’re an especially good choice for your child

Tell your kid he’s getting glasses, and his reaction can be less than enthusiastic. Tell him he’s getting the equivalent of “Transformers” for his eyes, and you’re likely to get a more positive response. Kids love watching these high-tech lenses go from clear to dark and back again

  1. UV Protection
    According to The Vision Council’s 2017 UV Report, children typically get three times the sun exposure of adults. And their developing eyes are especially vulnerable to UV radiation. Lenses that block 100% of UV radiation are vitally important for kids. Most light-reactive lenses offer that protection. Yes, so do most sunglasses, but if your child already wears glasses for vision correction, you know how hard it is to keep track of one pair of glasses, let alone a second pair of prescription sunglasses.
  2. Convenience and Cost
    Clear indoors, dark outdoors, in one pair of glasses. It doesn’t get much more convenient than that. And it doesn’t get much more cost-effective either. Getting your son or daughter a new pair of clear prescription lenses and prescription sunglasses every year adds up. Light-reactive lenses give them the benefits of both for the price of one.
  3. Comfort
    A common problem among very young children requiring vision correction is light sensitivity. Kids with lighter eye colors experience more light sensitivity in bright sunlight because darker-colored eyes contain more pigment to protect against harsh lighting. Once again, light-reactive lenses are the perfect solution, providing comfort and relief from brightness outdoors in their darkened state.
  4. Blue Light Filtration
    Blue light is a high-energy light emitted by smartphones, tablets, computer monitors, LED and CFL lighting, and the sun. The human eye can’t focus blue light well, but it works overtime trying to do just that when we’re working on a computer screen, checking in on a smartphone, or playing games on a tablet. All that work can lead to eye strain in as little as two hours of exposure. Light-reactive lenses provide targeted blue light filtration outdoors from the sun, and indoors from digital devices and energy-efficient lighting
  5. Cool Factor
    Tell your kid he’s getting glasses, and his reaction can be less than enthusiastic. Tell him he’s getting the equivalent of “Transformers” for his eyes, and you’re likely to get a more positive response. Kids love watching these high-tech lenses go from clear to dark and back again.

So there you have it. Protection, cost, convenience, and comfort in one cool pair of glasses. Light-reactive lenses are the perfect option for you and your kids. Ask your VSP network eye doctor about them during your next visit.

For a limited time, try SunSync Light-Reactive Lenses, and you can enter to win an amazing trip to New York City. And don’t forget, VSP members save up to 40% on SunSync® Light-Reactive Lenses*.

*Savings are based on doctor’s retail price and may vary by VSP plan and purchase selection; average savings determined after benefits are applied. Available only through VSP doctors to VSP members with applicable plan benefits. Ask your VSP doctor for details

This is a guest post by VSP Global employee, Paul J.

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