DVF | Made for Glass collection launch event

Behind the Scenes of DVF | Made for Glass

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Today marks the launch of the highly anticipated DVF | Made for Glass collection!

This groundbreaking partnership underscores a unique intersection between fashion, technology and optics. The frames and sun shields are available for purchase through Net-a-Porter and Google.

VSP was on the scene earlier this month when Diane von Furstenberg debuted the eye-catching new designs at her 2015 Resort collection in Manhattan. Marchon Eyewear, VSP’s eyewear division, provided design and manufacturing expertise to help translate Diane’s vision  into reality (see BetaBeat for more on that).

The result?

A stunning collection of five frames and two shades–in a multitude of luscious colors–that translate the technology from something merely wearable, to something enviably ready-to-wear for the confident and connected DVF woman.

After all, as Diane says so eloquently: “Technology is your best accessory.”

For a peek behind the action, check out our exclusive behind-the-scenes photos below:

The iconic grand staircase soars through the center of DVF's studio in Manhattan.

The iconic grand staircase soars through the center of DVF’s studio in Manhattan.

Wrap dress-clad fashionistas test out the DVF Made for Glass designs.

Wrap dress-clad fashionistas test out the DVF Made for Glass designs.

Striking a high-tech pose.

Striking a high-tech pose.

Google employees outfitting attendees Glass.

Google employees outfitting attendees Glass.

(l-r) VSP Global CMO, Kate Renwick-Espinosa; Marchon VP of Design, Leslie Muller; Diane von Furstenberg; Marchon Senior Designer Lucy Wang.

(l-r) VSP Global CMO, Kate Renwick-Espinosa; Marchon VP of Design, Leslie Muller; Diane von Furstenberg; Marchon Senior Designer Lucy Wang.

All smiles on the runway in DVF Made for Glass and the 2015 Resort collection prints.

All smiles on the runway in DVF Made for Glass and the 2015 Resort collection prints.

Models pose in more DVF styles and DVF Made for Glass frames.

Models pose in more DVF styles and DVF Made for Glass frames.

Diane von Furstenberg chats with fashion press and snaps a few photos of her collection, while wearing a DVF Made for Glass sun shield.

Diane von Furstenberg chats with fashion press and snaps a few photos of her collection, while wearing a DVF Made for Glass sun shield.

Marchon's VP of Design, Leslie Muller (l), chats with Google's Ivy Ross (c) and Isabelle Olsson (r).

Marchon’s VP of Design, Leslie Muller (l), chats with Google’s Ivy Ross (c) and Isabelle Olsson (r).

Fashion press admire the 2015 Resort collection.

Fashion press admire the 2015 Resort collection.

Picture-perfect packaging, with a DVF twist.

Picture-perfect packaging, with a DVF twist.

Framing the moment with DVF Made for Glass.

Framing the moment with DVF Made for Glass.

Diane's iconic Warhol's overlook the festivities.

Diane’s iconic Warhol’s overlook the festivities.

Not-so-mellow yellow.

Not-so-mellow yellow.

Having a blue moment.

Having a blue moment.

Red, red divine.

Red, red divine.

"Technology is your best accessory." - Diane von Furstenberg

“Technology is your best accessory.” – Diane von Furstenberg

Marchon Eyewear and VSP employees were proud to celebrate the launch of the DVF Made for Glass collection with such a visionary partner. Thanks, Diane!

Marchon Eyewear and VSP employees celebrate with our visionary partner. Thanks, Diane!

(All photos by Brooke Ismach | Studio Brooke).

28 Comments

  • Jennifer says:

    Google Glass looks ridiculous! I will never wear them, as I don’t want to look like a Cyborg! Not the look I’m going for.

  • Susan says:

    Am I missing something? What does DVF stand for? And I don’t see an explanation for the little camera, or whatever it is on the side. I looked at all the related articles, here, and am either completely missing it or these things are explained.

  • Beverly says:

    All of the glasses shown on the models and any of the photos, are too large for my face. I have high real apples for cheeks when I smile so the glasses would move and the lens would be smeared. If these are glass they could be too heavy for some people with high prescriptions which I had before cataract surgery. Even now I can’t wear tri-flex glasses and need bifocals plus glass with my middle vision and the reading. I don’t see the DVF glasses being a real hit with the overall population.

  • Raywood Mickles says:

    Are the glasses made for men in no-line glasses

  • Kelly Crane says:

    Interesting for sure, but I’m not interested in blocky 50s looking eyewear. Yes it is neat and cool to be designer, its great and innovative for the geekware look. Do I want to have that hanging weight on my face even 4 or eight hours at a work related enviroment? Not really. Now lets touch on cost… regular eyeware is too expensive before attatching the gadget. How many cell phones does the fashion concerned, techie run through? Breakage? Lost?expensive is etched in its atoms. I just want to see to function in my every day life. I want to see the word around me, not face planted in a gadget.

  • Jon says:

    What is the visual benefit of the attachment on the glasses?

  • Renee Rice says:

    Diane VonFursteinberg’s “classy” fashions, makeup, perfume or accessories, was part of every woman’s closet, worldwide. Welcome back Diane!

  • Tom Geis says:

    DVF are her initials. We need a lot less gadgetry. It is time to be human again. The gadget is just an expensive distraction to help you avoid real life. God gave you eyes, which are all you need.

  • Jan says:

    This article explained nothing. You have to search for information under Google glass which is a product that DVF is making frames for. No amount of style is going to prevent someone wearing the Google Glass apparatus from looking like something from Star Trek. UGLY and a major waste of money.

  • Johanna Casanova says:

    Me interesan unas gafas de sol

  • shane says:

    This ad really didn’t explain anything to me about the glassed all I could do is guess and wonder is there a camera or what I have to clue

  • Jeff says:

    How will this make VSP insured vision plans better for us in the “real” world? It doesn’t look as if your selling designer frames but digital technology. This sales plan doesn’t look well thought out enough to be assimilated by the VSP “Borg”.

    • Tracy T. says:

      Hi Jeff – Depending on the vision plan, VSP covers prescription lenses for Glass, as well as provides a reimbursement for DVF frames. This partnership is just another way we’re looking to provide smart and technologically-advanced eyewear to our members. -Tracy, VSP

  • Patricia says:

    What an exciting time for DVF. She’s an iconic designer who brought high fashion to daily wear, and she’s doing it again with technology. Change is a constant…it’s going to happen whether we like it’s or not. Looking forward to where Google Glass takes us now in style!

  • Chet says:

    What is it and what does it do???

  • Scott says:

    I admit the frames make Google Glass look a ton better. Still the technology is at least 5-10 years before it will be useful to the public. Only those people willing to look silly will wear these, no matter if the frames are designer or not. I say it’s a good thing so they can continue to develop Glass to the point where they do have potential. That will come when they apply a film to the inside of the lens that the wearer can see but the outside world can’t. No prisms or eye strain necessary. They are real close but have a ways to go.

  • Bill says:

    So, I have to say . . . the design shows a tragic lack of thought and inspiration. Symmetry is everything, science has proven that symmetry is how the brain perceives beauty. Why not mount the bulky camera above the bridge of the nose vice over the right eye?

  • Mike says:

    This article is typical of VSP Envision. It doesn’t answer any of the questions that real consumers have.

  • Awesome would love to rock a pair of these glasses.

  • Elizabeth says:

    DVF Made for Glass is not something that I would wear in its current form, but it is an interesting attempt to merge technology with fashion. I recently read an article on Style.com found here: http://www.style.com/trends/fashion/2014/fashion-tech-problem-silicon-valley that goes into great depth about different tech companies attempting to make technology more wearable. Apple was able to have a disruptive impact in the cellular phone market with its creation of the iPhone and I truly believe that it is only a matter of time before eye wear begins to incorporate more technology. It’s hard to say exactly what the products will look like, but whoever comes up with a marketable product first is likely to dominate the space for several years to come.

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