Level Smart Glasses Now Available on Eyeconic.com

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You’ve heard us talk about Level™ smart glasses before; smart glasses that feature technology seamlessly embedded into the temple of the frame to track your activity, distance and calories burned.

We launched Level earlier this year in partnership with select VSP network doctors participating in the VSP Premier Program. Now, Level smart glasses are available nationwide on Eyeconic.com.

Level on Eyeconic

Eyeconic is VSP’s only online, in-network optical site where you can buy eyeglasses, sunglasses and contact lenses with your VSP benefits. If you’ve seen your eye doctor recently, you can seamlessly upload your current prescription to Eyeconic and order your Level frames—all in one place.

Level smart glasses start at $328 with basic, single vision lenses on Eyeconic. As a VSP member, you’ll also be able to apply your benefits. And since Level is a featured frame brand, you’ll get an extra $20 to spend on top of your fame allowance!

In addition to the frames, you’ll receive a protective glasses case, USB charger and cord, glasses cleaning cloth and a smartphone app to track your activity measured through the glasses.

Level on Eyeconic

The Level smart glasses app also allows you to set daily step goals and accrue points. Once 50 points are achieved, you can donate a comprehensive eye exam and prescription glasses to someone in need.

With three different styles–Minksy, Hedy and Nikola–and four different colors, you’re bound to find a Level frame that fits your unique personality. But don’t take our word for it: Sites like Gear Patrol and Wareable recently posted rave reviews.

If you haven’t had an annual eye exam recently, schedule an appointment with a VSP network eye doctor.

31 Comments

  • Dan says:

    Would like more info please bout them

    • Angelina F. says:

      Hi Dan,
      You can find out more about Level smart glasses at http://www.leveltechnology.com/
      -Angelina F., VSP

    • D says:

      Sounds good but the health risks are probably high. This is a very dangerous technology. Radiation from cell phones have been proven to cause dangerous levels of radiation to your head area and puts people at risk of cancer. Having this technology at your temples will emit the same EMF/radiation. Not worth the risk!!!

      • Phillip Saugar says:

        FYI only: I’ve checked all my cellphones Samsung 1st S5, then S6, S7, and now my newest S9 with radiation detection equipment. Nothing but background natural radiation both at idle and phone activated. Nothing but background detected. .002 to .005 m/curries. Peace time limit per month is .05 m/currently. FYI:I have no involvement, intrest, nor work for this industry..

        • Dave Z says:

          Phillip, not that I agree with D but she specifically states EMF radiation. That is the Electro-Magnetic Field emitted by any device that transmits a signal, often containing data. It is the same type used by radio & television stations. It is the same type that is emitted by RADAR antennas. Would you stand in front of any of them for any length of time? Why not?
          If you have access to a geiger-muller counter to scan for ionizing particle radiation, I suspect you would know the difference between the two. I would also suspect that you know that your equipment will not register it. I can only conclude made your statement only to discredit D. That is not only rude, it is just plain wrong. Didn’t you get enough of that crap leading up to this election?
          There may not conclusive evidence that small EMF’s, such as these glasses would create, do cause cancer. There is proof that large fields do cause cancer. That should be enough evidence to conclude that it is possible for small ones to as well. Research should be done to determine if these fields do increase the risk of getting cancer, and by how much.
          IMO, making statements that are technically true while projecting a falsehood in hopes of making those less schooled on the subject believe your POV is no better than lying. Phillip, you should be ashamed of yourself for using such tactics. Try being completely truthful in your arguments. You will have something to be proud of if you convince others that your line of thinking is correct.
          For the record I also have no involvement in this industry, nor in any other that may profit or lose from believing my statements, Phillip’s, or D’s. I am just sick and tired of half truths & lies being portrayed as fact.

        • Robin says:

          The radiation for cellphone, bluetooth, wireless, etc. is radio waves (measured in watts or watts/unit area (or volume), not ionizing particles from radioactive decay (measured in Curries).

      • Jarrett says:

        Actually there has been studies that show health problems due to cellphones but there has been just as many studies showing there isn’t. You know you get about .05 rad daily just from being on the earths surface from the sun? Making a flight from California to New York gives you enjoy X-ray exposure equailvsnt to 3 dental X-rays. So just take it with a grain of common sense. Furthermore technology grows exponentially were people prolly received more from computer boards 10 years ago versus stuff today. Since moores law states every 18 months chips double in power and shrink twice their size in that same time frame.

      • John Smith says:

        wow, have you any idea what you are talking about. This uses low level bluetooth tech not cell phones.

      • Angelina F. says:

        Hi D,
        According to FDA research, there exists no evidence that links health problems to prolonged exposure to radio frequency fields, such as those produced by cell phones, Wi-Fi, etc. For comparison’s sake, Level transmits 160 microwatts of output power via wireless connectivity. A cell phone transmits roughly 251 milliwatts (or, about 1,600 times as much). Wi-Fi transmits about 200 milliwatts of output power (or, about 1,250 times as much). However, if you have a pacemaker or other internal electronic device, consult your physician before using any activity tracking device that monitors motion, such as Level.

        More information about Level smart glasses can be found at leveltechnology.com

        -Angelina F., VSP

  • Susan Halperin says:

    My smart phone does all that and it seems pretty accurate with the right app. Whats the difference?

    • C Martorella says:

      i’m more likely to have my glasses on all day, then to have my phone in my pocket for every step.

    • Daniel says:

      Susan, I also agree with your comment. What is teh bottom line incentive on getting these frames. I think VSP may have gotten into the tracking market way late.

    • Inger Amus says:

      It’s embedded in the glasses instead of your phone

    • Jake says:

      Basically, nothing. From reading their documentation, it appears they’ve shoehorned the capabilities of a $50 health tracker as you’d get from Garmin of Fitbit into some glasses frames. It would be really neat if the unit gave some sort of visual feedback, but the only visual indicator appears to be if the unit is charging or not…probably not that useful for glasses frames that are worn on the head.

  • Art Ist says:

    Can you get them with a hidden cam?

  • Agree with you. These are probably super expensive too!

    • Angelina F. says:

      Hi Helene,
      Level smart glasses have an MSRP of $270, which excludes prescription lenses. Final price will vary based on a number of factors, including lens enhancements, the application of vision insurance benefits, and retail location. On Eyeconic, Level smart glasses start at $328 with basic, single vision lenses.
      -Angelina F., VSP

  • dave says:

    Other than the ability to locate your eyeglasses, everything mentioned on their site is a replication of what the typical smartphone already does. TBH, even if this is “better” tech and more accurate, does it really matter whether your step and calorie counts are a little off just using the phone (or watch)? Unless the delta is significant, the overall influence of it is meaningless.

    This seems like an example of “just because you can, does not mean you should”… BTW, I noted that the app appears to send all the data to someone else’s server, otherwise the HIPPA statement would be un-necessary. A lot of apps do put this data somewhere else, but again, what’s the real ultimate use of the data itself. There has to be a value proposition here for LEVEL.

  • Marthese says:

    How can I find out what doctors in your network specifically offer these glasses so that I can try them on before purchasing them?

  • StevenL says:

    you’ll get an extra $20 to spend on top of your fame allowance!
    Typo on the word “fRame”. I hope there are no little bugs in the firmware, too. Just saying…

  • Julius Green says:

    So all ot does is show you your steps?

    • Angelina F. says:

      Hi Julius,
      Level smart glasses track step count, distance traveled, overall active minutes, and calories burned. You can learn more at http://www.leveltechnology.com/
      -Angelina F., VSP

    • Angelina F. says:

      Hi Julius,
      Step counts can be viewed within the level app which is available for both iOS and Android phones. A complete list of compatible devices can be found in the support section of leveltechnology.com
      -Angelina F., VSP

  • Chris McAlee says:

    These are of no use to me. Coverage of frames and lenses for shooting, specifically clay target shooting. Decott, Randolph Engineering, are two of the brands.

  • Hannah says:

    I have 2 VSP insurance (one from my employer, one from my husband’s employer). Can I use both insurance to buy 1 glass/frame?

    • Angelina F. says:

      Thank you for your message. For this type of question, you can contact VSP Member Services at (800) 877-7195 or send an email using the form under the Contact Us section on http://www.vsp.com and we’re happy to help. To best assist you, please be prepared to provide the subscriber/member name, date of birth, and last four digits of the Social Security number. Please note that although we make reasonable efforts to protect your information from loss, misuse, or alteration by third parties, you should be aware that there is always some risk involved in transmitting information over the Internet. -Angelina F., VSP

  • Michael says:

    Can this do anything besides activity tracking, or is that all? I thought this would be likes a heads-up display (HUD) but was disappointed to see only activity tracking mentioned.

    Now, what Chris McAlee says about glasses tracking objects and other things, now that would be technology at its finest!

  • Ahuman01 says:

    Bluetooth is radio waves?
    If so no that’s to close to my brain!!

    • Angelina F. says:

      Hi,

      Here is some information about the level of exposure to radio frequency from leveltechnology.com.

      According to FDA research, there exists no evidence that links health problems to prolonged exposure to radio frequency fields, such as those produced by cell phones, Wi-Fi, etc. For comparison’s sake, Level transmits 160 microwatts of output power via wireless connectivity. A cell phone transmits roughly 251 milliwatts (or, about 1,600 times as much). Wi-Fi transmits about 200 milliwatts of output power (or, about 1,250 times as much). However, if you have a pacemaker or other internal electronic device, consult your physician before using any activity tracking device that monitors motion, such as Level.

      -Angelina F., VSP

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